St. Joseph’s Nationally Recognized for Excellence

“We are honored to receive this national recognition from Fortune/Merative,” said Don Wiley, president and CEO of St. Joseph’s Medical Center. (Cyndy Green photo)

Way too often the San Joaquin Valley is referred to as a desert. Culturally, economically – even educationally and for health care. The all too common – and misguided – perception by outsiders is that no one wants to live here.

Locals know better. The restaurants are top notch. The local wine scene is internationally renowned. There are activities galore. You can find a job as an entry level worker all the way up through high paying careers in finance, agriculture, business and health care.

And the latter is where we can now stake our claim.

On Wednesday, August 30, St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Stockton proudly announced that it had earned a spot on the Fortune/Merative 100 Top Hospitals list to a gathering of staff, supporters, and volunteers in the Dr. Henry and Silvia Wong educational building.

This is the first time St. Joseph’s has earned this distinction.  This ranking included being in the best major teaching hospitals and the best large community hospitals categories. 2650 hospitals nationwide were evaluated by Merative (a data, analytics, technology company).

“We are honored to receive this national recognition from Fortune/Merative,” said Don Wiley, president and CEO of St. Joseph’s Medical Center. “It is a true testament to the dedication of our clinical staff in ensuring patients receive quality care and to our Community Health department in developing and implementing programs that improve the health of the San Joaquin community.”

The hospitals included on the Fortune/Merative 100 Top Hospitals list had better results on critical clinical and operational performance indicators. These include survival rates, patient complications, healthcare-associated infections, 30-day mortality and 30-day hospital-wide readmission rates, length of stay, throughput in emergency departments, inpatient expenses, profitability, and patient ratings.

Additionally, Wiley acknowledged that interns in their medical program have often decided to continue working in the local community rather than leaving for larger hospitals in bigger cities.

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